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Coronavirus Impact and Assurance: Yes! We are still open for business!

For the last year, thanks to the hard work of all of our staff, and you, our clients, no one who works at this office has gotten Covid while working here, and we have not spread a single case to any of our clients, while getting all of our client's legal needs taken care of. With the spread of vaccination the end is in sight, normal times where we can meet our clients in person in the office are just around the corner.

During the transition we will be having some in person, in office appointments for clients who have already been vaccinated, and for whom the CDC recommended period of time has passed since their last shot. Of course, for anyone who would prefer a phone or video appointment for safety, convenience, or any other reason those types of appointments are always available.

For our clients who have not yet completed the vaccination cycle phone and video appointments are of course available, and, with the return of warm weather we will again be offering outside appointments under the tent right outside our front door. For all appointments, masks will continue to be required.

Through the transition safety of all staff and clients will continue to be our top priority, we look forward to seeing you soon.

Please see our blog for more info on pandemic response.

How witness testimony can influence a criminal proceeding

| Aug 8, 2019 | Criminal Defense

Minnesota residents could be harmed if a police officer engages in misconduct. In some cases, misconduct could include lying on a witness stand or otherwise providing inaccurate information in a criminal matter. Recognizing this possibility, groups in Florida, California and Texas have sent letters to authorities in those states. The letters ask that police officers who engage in misconduct not be allowed to testify in criminal cases.

Many communities have Brady lists of officers who are not used in a criminal prosecution. In California, the district attorney in Orange County placed four officers on his Brady list. This occurred after information came to light that they solicited statements from suspects through jailhouse informants. The statements were made by the suspects without having access to legal counsel.

Most jurisdictions do not make their Brady lists available to the public. Instead, they are given to defense attorneys who can use them to create doubt as to an officer’s credibility. On Jan. 1, a law took effect in California that would make information about certain types of past misconduct public. However, police unions are challenging the law citing privacy concerns. They say that only misconduct that occurs after the law took effect should be available for interested parties to see.

Individuals who have been charged with a crime are entitled to a zealous defense. A criminal defense attorney may be able to help a defendant obtain a plea deal or an acquittal. This could be done by casting doubt on testimony used at trial or suppressing evidence such as statements made in jail or at any other time without counsel present.

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